Here for you. Resources & Telehealth Update

Dear Danforth East Wellness Community,

 

There have been lots of questions and information circulating about how COVID-19 may impact your family, your business, and your healthcare.  I am reaching out to ask:

 

How are you?

 

How can I help?

 

Although the physical clinic is closed, I’m still offering consults by Telehealth, including free 15-minute discovery calls.  I have increased my availability so I can be of service to you, when it is convenient for you.  My new hours are listed below.

 

I also want to provide you with some additional information and resources to help support your awareness of the situation and how it may affect you.  The two factors for contracting any infectious illness are based on susceptibility and exposure:

 

Exposure is a huge focus, and the evidence shows that COVID-19 transmits via Droplets & Contact, including surfaces. Droplet/Surface precautions are what you have to focus on.  This includes cleaning surfaces, practicing hand hygiene, avoid touching your face, and physical distancing. Please continue to do your part to help flatten the curve.

Here are some great resources to check out for more information.

Proper Hand Washing Technique

What to do if you are sick

What it means to self-monitor vs. self-isolate vs. quarantine

 

Susceptibility involves a more complex array of factors. There is an increased risk of more severe outcomes for Canadians:

  • aged 65 and over
  • with compromised immune systems
  • with underlying medical conditions

 

There is no better time than now to focus on your health.  My priority is ensuring you get the support you need, and invest in your health in a productive way – so you can be the best version of you. 

      

Above all else, I hope you are keeping safe, remaining calm and focusing on the important things – family, love, kindness, and gratitude. 

 

I am here for you.  Please do not hesitate to reach out.  

 

In health & happiness, 

Dr. Nicole, ND

Tuesdays 12:00pm – 8:00pm

Thursdays 9:30am – 5:30pm

Saturdays 9:30am – 2:30pm

BOOK HERE or send an email to drnicole@danfortheastwellness.ca with your questions or to let me know how you’re feeling.

  
As a reminder, please continue to practice social distancing and other public health recommendations.  If you have any of the symptoms and/or risk factors associated with COVID-19, please remain at home, and contact your local public health unit (found HERE) or Telehealth Ontario (1-866-797-0000) for more information. 

Rise & Shine – Optimizing your sleep & energy

       Sleep helps regulate our circadian rhythm – a dynamic flow of hormones, enzymes, and neurotransmitters that alternate activity levels between day and night. During sleep, we heal and grow as our body processes what we eat, think, and do each day. During the day, we supply our body with the signals it needs to function and accomplish tasks, but this can be impaired if we haven’t yet processed the day(s) before.  With inadequate sleep, your body tries to catch up with day to day functioning, and your healing and growth gets left behind.

 

         Sleep hygiene refers to various aspects of daily habits relating to a good quality nights’ sleep. The quality of your sleep can be reflected in different patterns of insomnia, such as:

  • difficulty falling asleep

  • waking through the night

  • early waking

 

But sleep dysfunction (which may not look like one of the above) can also present as:

  • feeling unrefreshed in the morning

  • low energy levels throughout the day

  • reduced cognitive function

  • mood changes and higher stress

  • downstream effects on hormones, stress, digestion, and metabolic functioning

 

These are my top tips for improving your sleep to feel great!


1.
Regular Sleep timing – Establish a regular bed time and wake time, and routines to go along with them.  Your body will naturally adjust to and benefit from sleeping at a consistent time.  We get the best quality sleep between the hours of 9pm and 6am – aim for the bulk of your sleep to happen during these hours.  Try to avoid weekend late nights and long sleep-ins as this will disrupt your routine.  Also don’t go to bed wide awake OR completely exhausted – these reflect your cortisol levels which can impact sleep quality if too high or too low.  Aim for a time when your body is naturally ready to sleep but before you crash.

 

2. Sleep rituals – Doing things to remind your body that it is almost bedtime will help improve sleep onset.  This can include relaxing stretches, yin yoga, meditation, guided imagery, breathing exercises, reading a book, taking a warm bath, or drinking herbal (non-caffeinated) tea. Avoid doing anything stimulating.  Check out apps like insight timer, Calm, or Headspace for guided meditations.  Journalling can also be great for getting your thoughts or next-day tasks out on paper so you’re not thinking (or dreaming) about them while trying to sleep.

 

4. Light exposure – Screens, street lights, night lights, all the lights affect your brains ability to recognize when it’s night time.  This impacts the production of our master sleep hormone, melatonin, and the circadian rhythm.  Avoid evening light exposure by reducing screen time from computer, tv, phone, tablet, etc. after 8-9pm and/or wear blue-light blocking glasses.  You can get them from most companies that sell eye  glasses these days, or even on Amazon!  At night time, wear an eye mask or get blackout curtains to reduce indirect light exposure from street lights, night lights, etc.  Each morning, natural sunlight exposure – walk outside, work near a bright window, or try a SAD/happy lamp; a minimum of 30 minutes each morning can improve mood and energy through the day!

5. Eat well – It seems obvious to avoid sugary foods before bed, but you may not realize that other carbohydrates like bread, pasta, cereals, and even milk contain sugars.  This can be stimulating as the body breaks them down and increases your blood sugar and insulin to spike. This can cause reactive hypoglycemia – a quick drop in blood sugar – within a few hours after you have gone to sleep and can stimulate a waking response often associated with feelings of anxiousness.  Ultimately, it’s best to avoid having late dinners, aiming for at least 3 hours before bedtime, and make sure it’s rich in veggies, protein, and healthy fats to provide your mind and body with the building blocks for healing.  If in need of a snack before bedtime, make sure it’s also high in protein and healthy fat.

 

There are many factors that can both lead to and be a result of poor sleep.  My best advice is to speak with your naturopathic doctor about how your sleep may be affecting you, and possible sleep aide options.  Natural health products like botanical and nutraceutical supplements can help assist the body in regulating sleep onset, depth, duration, and circadian rhythm, but may not be right for everyone.  There may be other physiological causes of your sleep dysfunction that can be investigated with the right practitioner. 

In health & happiness,

Dr.Nicole, ND

Dr. Nicole DeYonge, Naturopathy

Learn more about Dr.Nicole at www.nicoledeyongend.com